Spotlight on Andrew Ginzburg / by Haley Smith

Meet Andrew Ginzburg - founder of Loki, a collaborative video streaming service for events. Read more about his busy college years as a D1 athlete and his choice to pursue entrepreneurship after graduation.

 

Tell us about Loki. 

Loki is all about using the technology at our disposal to allow us to see the BIG picture. Every single one of us has an HD video camera at all times. Real perspectives are being captured on a lens by anyone, anytime, anywhere. But as individuals, we currently do not have the capability to access much of that content. There could be thousands of people recording at a given event. But when you want to go watch that event, you have to pick 1 or just a few of those perspectives to see through. As a society that relies on video as a medium to ground us with an understanding of reality, one perspective is a very limited experience. The only way to see the big picture, is to see it from multiple perspectives. So Loki is a video streaming service in which people at events collaborate to live-stream real experiences from multiple perspectives. Viewers are then able to tune in by seeing through the variety of available perspectives that they choose in real time. In other words, Loki is a media company in which the videographers are anyone on the scene of an event, and the viewers are their own directors.

In college, you were a D1 athlete, a full-time student, and worked at a marketing agency. How did you balance all of this?

As a college student, there are always a few pins in your life that need to be juggled. For me, it was school, tennis, work, social life, and sleep. There were definitely points in college where I felt absolutely overwhelmed and stressed with the amount on my plate. At the end of the day, I realized that had to remove the things from my life that didn't bring me optimal happiness. I found that when I was challenging myself in work, school, and tennis, I was really into what I was doing. I was vibing super hard, and was in an optimal state of mind. I noticed that the points in my life where I was least happy were actually at superficial social outings to bars. I felt like I was wasting my time and not doing the stuff I was passionate about. So decided to ignore the social stigma, and gave up a big part of my social life. I also sacrificed a bit of sleep as well. ;)

Tell us about your decision to pursue the entrepreneurial path postgrad rather than applying for "normal" jobs?

Honestly, the “entrepreneurial path” wasn’t something I truly believed I would ever be able to do until I just said f*ck it. I always dreamed about the “Silicon Valley” life. To have an idea, a team of guys, and a foundation of mentors and investors who will push you on a crazy journey. I think one day it just hit me. That if I really wanted to do it, there was nothing actually stopping me. All of the barriers to go for it were just in my head. I just felt this really powerful calling to do my own thing, and to make my own mark on the world. Of course this journey is nothing like I expected it to be, but it has still been incredibly crazy, terrifying, challenging, and I have never regretted a second of it. I love the work, and I truly believe what we are building can, as the saying goes, make the world a better place.